Question by The Professor: Should I go to a synagogue or a church, I want to meet friendly people?
Unfortunately I live alone in a secluded part of New York. I would like to meet people, friendly people. Should I go to the synagogues singles meetings or the church singles fellowships.

I do not have a background of Christian or Jewish and need to know which group might be more welcoming to me an atheist.

Best answer:

Answer by KarmaKing
Go to meet the One True God, and no one else.

God Bless

What do you think? Answer below!

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    Want to learn how to create videos like this? Or how to produce beats like this? Go to:www.todaysbeats.com 50 Cent Remake Diamond Dog “In The Church” Music Video I started at the age of 12, From Detroit,MI.,and I have opened up for various artist such as, Kid-n-Play, P-Funk, AMG, Da Brat, Cherelle, Whodini, MC Lyte, Bloodstone (legendary r+b group). Also won Amature Night At The Apollo, Hosted by Ralph Cooper Jr.(son of the owner). Won 1st place in The Pepsi Rap Up The Summer Contest (best in detroit), Then went on to Universal Studios in California to finish 2nd Hosted by MC Hammer and Dee Barnes. Produced album for Outburst Jam, artist, “LaRockco Tee” album titled, “Hold On Tight” (1994). Produced single for AMG (DJ Quick’s partner) titled, “Realionaire.com”. Produced for P-Funk’s “Paul Hill”, “MC Breed”, Redman’s artist “Ickurus” and nearly every Hip-Hop/R&B artist in Detroit. Also performed with “Kurtis Blow”, (as back up stage dj) Performed on venue with “Vickie Winians” at Second Ebenizier’s Baptist Church in Det.,MI. Made a very impressive impact at “The Gospel Music Workshop Of America” in Tampa Flordia (2003) with 700 cds sold in three days! Then went on to Kansas City,Mo. “GMWA” to do just as well!! I also performed in various concerts thourgh out the states, New York, Connecticut, Penn, Atlanta, Winnipeg, Canada (Providence Of Manitoba) Rochester,NY., Califorina, Chicago, Lake Charles,Louisiana,etc.. Also done various radio interviews on FM and AM stations

    Ancient Irish Hymn by 4Him – More traditional hymns – www.reverbnation.com http:/ww.4him.net/index.html (website online) – lead singer – Andy Chrisman, Kirk Sullivan, Mark Harris, Marty Magehee – You can hear more of the lead singer Andy Chrisman’s contemporary Christian music at MySpace.com at this website address: www.myspace.com Also, you can Listen to WORSHIP…with Andy Chrisman on these American radio stations Sunday mornings: WJIE – Louisville, KY – 8:30am-10:30am Sundays FUSE FM THE CROSS – Monroe, LA – 7am-11am Sundays KXOJ – Tulsa – 6:00am-10:00am Sundays Hymn Story: With its heartfelt poetry and moving melody, “Be Thou My Vision” beautifully expresses the desires of the Christian heart. Though its popularity rose only in the past fifty years or so, the hymn actually has a rich history dating back to the eighth century. Between the years of 400 and 700 AD the Irish people lived out a passionate faith in Christ. Ireland took up the missionary endeavor with excitement, and the country became known for its all-absorbing efforts to share Christianity throughout the world. Irish missionaries were found from Scotland to Switzerland, spreading the Good News wherever they went. Some scholars believe that the words to the hymn are the product of a man known simply as St. Patrick. Patrick was born in AD 373 along the banks of the River Clyde in what is now called Scotland. When he was 16 he was kidnapped by pirates and taken as a slave to Ireland. There he gave his life
    Video Rating: 4 / 5


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      Some cool Christian Dating Sites images:

      St. Nahi’s is an 18th-century church in Dundrum, Dublin, Ireland
      Christian Dating Sites

      Image by infomatique
      St. Nahi is an 18th-century church in Dundrum, Dublin, Ireland

      The name Taney derives from Tigh Naithi meaning the house or place of Nahi, and who may also be associated with Tobarnea, a seashore well that near Blackrock. The current church is still in use by the local Church of Ireland community and is one of two churches in the Parish of Taney (historically encompassing the whole area around Dundrum). It is built on the site of an early Irish monastery founded by Saint NahÍ.

      St. Nahi’s stands on the grounds of the original monastery, having been refurbished several times, most recently in 1910, after a period when it was in use as the local boy’s national school. Following storm damage to the roof, a major refurbishment was carried out by the then Rector of the Parish, Canon William Monk Gibbon (father of the poet of the same name), who is buried in the grounds of the church. A plaque erected after the refurbishment reads:
      “The entrance gate to this Churchyard was erected by the parishioners of Taney Parish to the memory of William Monk Gibbons, Canon of Christ Church Cathedral by whose impression and effort the restoration of this church was accomplished. He repaired the alter of the Lord”.

      Cremated remains are interred to the left of the entrance gates. This area was originally a mass famine grave and later used for patients of the Dundrum Central Mental Hospital. Old records refer to this area as the Asylum Plot.

      A back gate to the church was only recently uncovered under much overgrowth. Although it had been used by teachers as a shortcut between the Church (when it was being used as a boys national school) and the nearby girls national school, its original function is said to have been as an entrance for Roman Catholics when attending funerals at a time when they were barred from entering the main gates of a Protestant church.

      Many Irish Republican graves lie within the graveyard, including the gravestones of Lorcain McSuibhne, a member of the Irish Republican Army killed in 1922 in Kildare (his funeral occurred at St. Nahi’s and there exists photographic evidence of Eamon DeValera in attendance) and of James Burke, who was killed in Croke Park on Bloody Sunday. There is also a 1798 plot where some fatalities of the 1798 uprising are buried.

      The graveyard also contains many Royal Irish Constabulary Officers and Freemasons. Just one casualty of the Second World War is recorded there. Sgt. William Anthony Kavanagh, RAF Volunteer Reserve, age 24, died 23 sept 1944, son of William and Mary Kavanagh of Dundrum.

      Currently over 10,000 burials have been recorded, with the earliest visible gravestone dating back to 1734. The Parish of Taney: a History of Dundrum, Near Dublin, and its Neighbourhood published in 1895, claims that there are “tens of thousands” of burials within the graveyard, a credible figure considering its age.

      As the churchyard predates the disestablishment of the Church of Ireland in 1869, it is open for burial to all those who live within the boundaries of the Parish of Taney, whatever their denomination.

      The church contains some interesting artefacts including the baptismal font of the Duke of Wellington who was baptised in 1769, donated to Taney Parish in 1914 by the closing of St. Kevin’s Church in Camden Row, and altar tapestries depicting scenes from the Bible. The tapestries illustrating the Last Supper were made by the two Yeats sisters Lily and Lolly Yeats, both of whom are interred in the graveyard.

      Two Rathdown Slabs are displayed inside the church. These ornate burial slabs date back 1,000 years to the Viking-Christian era. Such slabs have only been found in the barony of Rathdown (the area roughly covering Churchtown to Bray). Only about 30 of these slabs have been discovered to date, these two were discovered in 2002 in the graveyard by archaeologist Chris Corlett, who had missed his bus from Dundrum and decided to explore the cemetery. Aided by Dúchas, the slabs were relocated inside the church.

      An insight into life expectancy for the area can be gleaned from the “Index to the Register of Burials” for the parish between January 1897 and April 1917 show 1,836 people buried during this period, of which 551 were children under 6 years of age.

      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Nahi%27s_Church


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        St Bride’s Church on Fleet Street

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        St Bride’s Church on Fleet Street
        Christian Dating Sites

        Image by wallygrom
        From Wikipedia –
        St Bride’s Church is a church in the City of London, England. The building’s most recent incarnation was designed by Sir Christopher Wren in 1672 on Fleet Street in the City of London, though Wren’s original building was largely gutted by fire during the London Blitz in 1940. Due to its location on Fleet Street it has a long association with journalists and newspapers. The church is a distinctive sight on London’s skyline and is clearly visible from a number of locations. Standing 69 meters high, it is the 2nd tallest of all Wren’s churches, with only St Paul’s itself having a higher pinnacle. The tiered spire is said to have been the inspiration for the design of modern tiered wedding cakes.

        St Bride’s may be one of the most ancient churches in London, with worship perhaps dating back to the conversion of the Middle Saxons in the 7th century. It has been conjectured that, as the patron saint is St Bridget of Ireland, it may have been founded by Celtic monks, missionaries proselytising the English.

        The present St Bride’s is at least the seventh church to have stood on the site. Traditionally it was founded by St Bridget in the sixth century. Whether or not she founded it personally, the remnants of the first church appear to have significant similarities to a church of the same date in Kildare, Ireland. The Norman church, built in the 11th century, was of both religious and secular significance; in 1210 King John held a parliament there. It was replaced by a larger church in the 15th century.

        St Bride’s association with the newspaper business began in 1500 when Wynkyn de Worde set up a printing press next door. Until 1695 London was the only city in Britain where printing was permitted by law.

        In the late 1580s one Eleanor White, daughter to the gentleman artist and explorer John White, was married in St Bride’s, to the tiler and bricklayer Ananias Dare. Their daughter Virginia Dare was to be the first English child born in North America. She was born on Roanoke Island on August 19th 1587: “Elenora, daughter to the governour and wife to Ananias Dare, one of the assistants, was delivered of a daughter in Roanoke”. The child was healthy and “was christened there the Sunday following, and because this childe was the first Christian borne in Virginia, she was named Virginia”. A modern bust of Virginia Dare stands near the font, replacing an earlier monument which was stolen and has not been recovered.

        In the mid-sixteenth century disaster struck. In 1665 the Great Plague of London killed 238 parishioners in a single week, and in 1666, the following year, the church was completely destroyed during the Great Fire of London, which burned much of the city. After the fire, the old church was replaced by an entirely new building designed by Sir Christopher Wren, one of his largest and most expensive works, taking seven years to build.

        The famous spire was added later, in 1701-1703. It originally measured 234 ft but lost its upper eight feet to a lightning strike in 1764. The design utilises four octagonal stages of diminishing height capped with an obelisk which terminates in a ball and vane.

        Buried at St. Bride’s is Robert Levet (Levett), a Yorkshireman who became a Parisian waiter, then a ‘practicer of physick’ who ministered to the denizens of London’s seedier neighborhoods. Having been duped into a bad marriage, the hapless Levet was taken in by the author Samuel Johnson who wrote his poem “On the Death of Mr. Robert Levet” eulogizing his good friend and tenant of many years. Also buried at St Bride’s are the organist and composer, Thomas Weelkes (d. 1623) and the poet, Richard Lovelace (d.1658), as well as author Samuel Richardson (d. 1761)

        The church was gutted by fire-bombs dropped by the Luftwaffe during the London Blitz of the Second World War, on the night of 29 December 1940, dubbed the “Second Great Fire of London” due to the enormous amount of damage caused. Some 1500 fires were started, including three major conflagrations; consequently causing a firestorm. St Paul’s Cathedral itself was only saved by the dedication of the London firemen who kept the fire away from the Cathedral and the volunteer firewatchers of the St Paul’s Watch who fought to keep the flames from firebombs on its roof from spreading. After the war, the St Brides’s was rebuilt at the expense of newspaper proprietors and journalists.

        One fortunate and unintended consequence of the bombing was the excavation of the church’s original sixth century Saxon foundations. Today the crypt, known as the Museum of Fleet Street, is open to the public and contains a number of ancient relics including Roman coins and medieval stained glass.

        St Bride’s has had a number of notable parishioners, including John Milton, John Dryden, and the diarist Samuel Pepys, who was baptized in the church. Pepys buried his brother Tom in the church in 1664, but by this stage the vaults were so overcrowded that Pepys had to bribe the gravedigger to “justle together” the corpses in order to make room. In 2009, Sir Clement Freud’s funeral was held in the church.

        Duomo Cathedral, Ortygia, Syracuse, Sicily
        Christian Dating Sites

        Image by travfotos
        In the 5th century BC, the Greeks built a temple to Athena on this site. It was converted to a Christian cathedral in 640 AD. The columned facade seen here dates from 1754 AD. It was added after an earthquake damaged the church in 1693 AD.


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          Check out these Christian Dating Sites images:

          St. Nahi’s is an 18th-century church in Dundrum, Dublin, Ireland
          Christian Dating Sites

          Image by infomatique
          St. Nahi is an 18th-century church in Dundrum, Dublin, Ireland

          The name Taney derives from Tigh Naithi meaning the house or place of Nahi, and who may also be associated with Tobarnea, a seashore well that near Blackrock. The current church is still in use by the local Church of Ireland community and is one of two churches in the Parish of Taney (historically encompassing the whole area around Dundrum). It is built on the site of an early Irish monastery founded by Saint NahÍ.

          St. Nahi’s stands on the grounds of the original monastery, having been refurbished several times, most recently in 1910, after a period when it was in use as the local boy’s national school. Following storm damage to the roof, a major refurbishment was carried out by the then Rector of the Parish, Canon William Monk Gibbon (father of the poet of the same name), who is buried in the grounds of the church. A plaque erected after the refurbishment reads:
          “The entrance gate to this Churchyard was erected by the parishioners of Taney Parish to the memory of William Monk Gibbons, Canon of Christ Church Cathedral by whose impression and effort the restoration of this church was accomplished. He repaired the alter of the Lord”.

          Cremated remains are interred to the left of the entrance gates. This area was originally a mass famine grave and later used for patients of the Dundrum Central Mental Hospital. Old records refer to this area as the Asylum Plot.

          A back gate to the church was only recently uncovered under much overgrowth. Although it had been used by teachers as a shortcut between the Church (when it was being used as a boys national school) and the nearby girls national school, its original function is said to have been as an entrance for Roman Catholics when attending funerals at a time when they were barred from entering the main gates of a Protestant church.

          Many Irish Republican graves lie within the graveyard, including the gravestones of Lorcain McSuibhne, a member of the Irish Republican Army killed in 1922 in Kildare (his funeral occurred at St. Nahi’s and there exists photographic evidence of Eamon DeValera in attendance) and of James Burke, who was killed in Croke Park on Bloody Sunday. There is also a 1798 plot where some fatalities of the 1798 uprising are buried.

          The graveyard also contains many Royal Irish Constabulary Officers and Freemasons. Just one casualty of the Second World War is recorded there. Sgt. William Anthony Kavanagh, RAF Volunteer Reserve, age 24, died 23 sept 1944, son of William and Mary Kavanagh of Dundrum.

          Currently over 10,000 burials have been recorded, with the earliest visible gravestone dating back to 1734. The Parish of Taney: a History of Dundrum, Near Dublin, and its Neighbourhood published in 1895, claims that there are “tens of thousands” of burials within the graveyard, a credible figure considering its age.

          As the churchyard predates the disestablishment of the Church of Ireland in 1869, it is open for burial to all those who live within the boundaries of the Parish of Taney, whatever their denomination.

          The church contains some interesting artefacts including the baptismal font of the Duke of Wellington who was baptised in 1769, donated to Taney Parish in 1914 by the closing of St. Kevin’s Church in Camden Row, and altar tapestries depicting scenes from the Bible. The tapestries illustrating the Last Supper were made by the two Yeats sisters Lily and Lolly Yeats, both of whom are interred in the graveyard.

          Two Rathdown Slabs are displayed inside the church. These ornate burial slabs date back 1,000 years to the Viking-Christian era. Such slabs have only been found in the barony of Rathdown (the area roughly covering Churchtown to Bray). Only about 30 of these slabs have been discovered to date, these two were discovered in 2002 in the graveyard by archaeologist Chris Corlett, who had missed his bus from Dundrum and decided to explore the cemetery. Aided by Dúchas, the slabs were relocated inside the church.

          An insight into life expectancy for the area can be gleaned from the “Index to the Register of Burials” for the parish between January 1897 and April 1917 show 1,836 people buried during this period, of which 551 were children under 6 years of age.

          en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Nahi%27s_Church

          St. Nahi’s is an 18th-century church in Dundrum, Dublin, Ireland
          Christian Dating Sites

          Image by infomatique
          St. Nahi is an 18th-century church in Dundrum, Dublin, Ireland

          The name Taney derives from Tigh Naithi meaning the house or place of Nahi, and who may also be associated with Tobarnea, a seashore well that near Blackrock. The current church is still in use by the local Church of Ireland community and is one of two churches in the Parish of Taney (historically encompassing the whole area around Dundrum). It is built on the site of an early Irish monastery founded by Saint NahÍ.

          St. Nahi’s stands on the grounds of the original monastery, having been refurbished several times, most recently in 1910, after a period when it was in use as the local boy’s national school. Following storm damage to the roof, a major refurbishment was carried out by the then Rector of the Parish, Canon William Monk Gibbon (father of the poet of the same name), who is buried in the grounds of the church. A plaque erected after the refurbishment reads:
          “The entrance gate to this Churchyard was erected by the parishioners of Taney Parish to the memory of William Monk Gibbons, Canon of Christ Church Cathedral by whose impression and effort the restoration of this church was accomplished. He repaired the alter of the Lord”.

          Cremated remains are interred to the left of the entrance gates. This area was originally a mass famine grave and later used for patients of the Dundrum Central Mental Hospital. Old records refer to this area as the Asylum Plot.

          A back gate to the church was only recently uncovered under much overgrowth. Although it had been used by teachers as a shortcut between the Church (when it was being used as a boys national school) and the nearby girls national school, its original function is said to have been as an entrance for Roman Catholics when attending funerals at a time when they were barred from entering the main gates of a Protestant church.

          Many Irish Republican graves lie within the graveyard, including the gravestones of Lorcain McSuibhne, a member of the Irish Republican Army killed in 1922 in Kildare (his funeral occurred at St. Nahi’s and there exists photographic evidence of Eamon DeValera in attendance) and of James Burke, who was killed in Croke Park on Bloody Sunday. There is also a 1798 plot where some fatalities of the 1798 uprising are buried.

          The graveyard also contains many Royal Irish Constabulary Officers and Freemasons. Just one casualty of the Second World War is recorded there. Sgt. William Anthony Kavanagh, RAF Volunteer Reserve, age 24, died 23 sept 1944, son of William and Mary Kavanagh of Dundrum.

          Currently over 10,000 burials have been recorded, with the earliest visible gravestone dating back to 1734. The Parish of Taney: a History of Dundrum, Near Dublin, and its Neighbourhood published in 1895, claims that there are “tens of thousands” of burials within the graveyard, a credible figure considering its age.

          As the churchyard predates the disestablishment of the Church of Ireland in 1869, it is open for burial to all those who live within the boundaries of the Parish of Taney, whatever their denomination.

          The church contains some interesting artefacts including the baptismal font of the Duke of Wellington who was baptised in 1769, donated to Taney Parish in 1914 by the closing of St. Kevin’s Church in Camden Row, and altar tapestries depicting scenes from the Bible. The tapestries illustrating the Last Supper were made by the two Yeats sisters Lily and Lolly Yeats, both of whom are interred in the graveyard.

          Two Rathdown Slabs are displayed inside the church. These ornate burial slabs date back 1,000 years to the Viking-Christian era. Such slabs have only been found in the barony of Rathdown (the area roughly covering Churchtown to Bray). Only about 30 of these slabs have been discovered to date, these two were discovered in 2002 in the graveyard by archaeologist Chris Corlett, who had missed his bus from Dundrum and decided to explore the cemetery. Aided by Dúchas, the slabs were relocated inside the church.

          An insight into life expectancy for the area can be gleaned from the “Index to the Register of Burials” for the parish between January 1897 and April 1917 show 1,836 people buried during this period, of which 551 were children under 6 years of age.

          en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Nahi%27s_Church

          St. Nahi’s is an 18th-century church in Dundrum, Dublin, Ireland
          Christian Dating Sites

          Image by infomatique
          St. Nahi is an 18th-century church in Dundrum, Dublin, Ireland

          The name Taney derives from Tigh Naithi meaning the house or place of Nahi, and who may also be associated with Tobarnea, a seashore well that near Blackrock. The current church is still in use by the local Church of Ireland community and is one of two churches in the Parish of Taney (historically encompassing the whole area around Dundrum). It is built on the site of an early Irish monastery founded by Saint NahÍ.

          St. Nahi’s stands on the grounds of the original monastery, having been refurbished several times, most recently in 1910, after a period when it was in use as the local boy’s national school. Following storm damage to the roof, a major refurbishment was carried out by the then Rector of the Parish, Canon William Monk Gibbon (father of the poet of the same name), who is buried in the grounds of the church. A plaque erected after the refurbishment reads:
          “The entrance gate to this Churchyard was erected by the parishioners of Taney Parish to the memory of William Monk Gibbons, Canon of Christ Church Cathedral by whose impression and effort the restoration of this church was accomplished. He repaired the alter of the Lord”.

          Cremated remains are interred to the left of the entrance gates. This area was originally a mass famine grave and later used for patients of the Dundrum Central Mental Hospital. Old records refer to this area as the Asylum Plot.

          A back gate to the church was only recently uncovered under much overgrowth. Although it had been used by teachers as a shortcut between the Church (when it was being used as a boys national school) and the nearby girls national school, its original function is said to have been as an entrance for Roman Catholics when attending funerals at a time when they were barred from entering the main gates of a Protestant church.

          Many Irish Republican graves lie within the graveyard, including the gravestones of Lorcain McSuibhne, a member of the Irish Republican Army killed in 1922 in Kildare (his funeral occurred at St. Nahi’s and there exists photographic evidence of Eamon DeValera in attendance) and of James Burke, who was killed in Croke Park on Bloody Sunday. There is also a 1798 plot where some fatalities of the 1798 uprising are buried.

          The graveyard also contains many Royal Irish Constabulary Officers and Freemasons. Just one casualty of the Second World War is recorded there. Sgt. William Anthony Kavanagh, RAF Volunteer Reserve, age 24, died 23 sept 1944, son of William and Mary Kavanagh of Dundrum.

          Currently over 10,000 burials have been recorded, with the earliest visible gravestone dating back to 1734. The Parish of Taney: a History of Dundrum, Near Dublin, and its Neighbourhood published in 1895, claims that there are “tens of thousands” of burials within the graveyard, a credible figure considering its age.

          As the churchyard predates the disestablishment of the Church of Ireland in 1869, it is open for burial to all those who live within the boundaries of the Parish of Taney, whatever their denomination.

          The church contains some interesting artefacts including the baptismal font of the Duke of Wellington who was baptised in 1769, donated to Taney Parish in 1914 by the closing of St. Kevin’s Church in Camden Row, and altar tapestries depicting scenes from the Bible. The tapestries illustrating the Last Supper were made by the two Yeats sisters Lily and Lolly Yeats, both of whom are interred in the graveyard.

          Two Rathdown Slabs are displayed inside the church. These ornate burial slabs date back 1,000 years to the Viking-Christian era. Such slabs have only been found in the barony of Rathdown (the area roughly covering Churchtown to Bray). Only about 30 of these slabs have been discovered to date, these two were discovered in 2002 in the graveyard by archaeologist Chris Corlett, who had missed his bus from Dundrum and decided to explore the cemetery. Aided by Dúchas, the slabs were relocated inside the church.

          An insight into life expectancy for the area can be gleaned from the “Index to the Register of Burials” for the parish between January 1897 and April 1917 show 1,836 people buried during this period, of which 551 were children under 6 years of age.

          en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Nahi%27s_Church


          Christian Dating Service Related Info

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